Most parents experience feelings of both apprehension and relief when their teenagers get their driver licenses. Parents may be relieved because they no longer have to drive their teen around; however, they may also be concerned because the newly minted drivers may not be prepared for all the dangers of being on the road.

One serious concern is the number of distractions that confront teen drivers. Between electronic distractions such as cellphones as well as in-person conversations, teens create significant risks to themselves as well as others when they are behind the wheel.

Parents need to ask their teen drivers important questions before they give them the keys to the family car, such as where they are going, when are they coming home and with whom they are riding if someone else is driving. Parents should also consider how long the other driver has had their license as well as how many people will be in the car.

Some parents decide to forbid their teens to ride in cars with other teen drivers as well as forbid their teen to shuttle other teens around town. Although enlisting teens to drive their younger siblings to play dates and school might free up time for parents, it may not always be the safest choice. Ensuring that the teen does not drive minor passengers for several months to a year could be a step in the right direction as far as safety is concerned.

Each state has different legislation as far as teen driving is concerned; however, teens are not the only ones who become involved in motor vehicle accidents. An attorney who is experienced in auto accident litigation may be able to help someone who has suffered injuries or experienced property damage to get a fair settlement.